The company that will operate the “Adir” simulator has been chosen. The simulator will be a significant part of the training concept that the advanced jet brings with it

Zohar Boneh

The F-35I “Adir”, which is expected to land in Israel in the coming December will bring a number of innovations to the IAF with it. It will bring the IAF into the fifth generation, cause a significant quantum leap in the operational aspect and bring new concepts in logistics and training. Among the changes, there are the new training concepts that were decided upon in preparation for the arrival of the stealth fighter and as a part of which the “Adir” simulator will enter service and will be a significant tool with which the pilots will train. The IAF aspires that 50% of F-35I flight hours will be performed in the simulator.

Half of F-35I Flight Hours Will Be Simulated

Photography: Lockheed Martin

Ready for the First Flight
Last month, “Elbit Systems” was chosen by “Lockheed Martin” to operate the fighter jet’s training center that is currently being built in Nevatim AFB and will be responsible for maintaining and operating the technical aspects of the simulator. “The company will load the missions to the simulator, connect the different simulators, fix malfunctions and routinely supervise the activity in the simulator”, shared Maj. Matan, Commander of the “Adir” Training Center.

The simulator is suited to the fifth generation fighter concept in its structure and in the threats that it will simulate and will be identical to the one in the international training center in Luke AFB in Arizona. It will include four advanced simulators that can perform connected training and a classroom that equipped with 12 large touch screens. “The unique classroom will allow real-time practice so the pilots will be able to experience flying during class”, explained Maj. Matan.

Half of F-35I Flight Hours Will Be Simulated

Photography: Lockheed Martin

The simulator can simulate every possible scenario that might arise in flight, will allow the aircrews to rehearse complex scenarios that they cannot rehearse in the air and deal with extreme situations. “The tactical simulator will allow us to simulate missions better than in real flight. It is very similar to the jet itself – all of its systems are identical to the ‘Adir’s and the helmet that the pilots will train with, will simulate the real helmet and its display”, said Maj. Matan. “In addition, because Israel is a small country and we have limited training grounds, the simulator will allow us to train in every theatre and in any landscape”.

The simulator, just like the jet itself, is equipped with only on seat, so the pilot sits alone in the cockpit from the first flight. The “Golden Eagle” Squadron members will begin flying on it in late 2017. “After about 30 simulator sorties, we feel ready for the real thing”, he shared. “I feel prepared to take off with the jet alone, thanks to the simulator training, I know that I will be able to operate the jet fully”.